Jun 06

Nvidia Near-Eye Light Field Display: Background, Design and History [Video]

Nvidia Near-Eye Light Field Display: Binocular OLED-based prototype (Youtube Screenshot) About a year ago, Nvidia presented a novel head-mounted display that is based on light field technology and offers both depth and refocus capability to the human eye. Their so-called Near-Eye Light Field Display was more a proof of concept, but it’s exciting new technology that solves a number of existing problems with stereoscopic virtual reality glasses.

Nvidia researcher Douglas Lanman recently gave a talk at Augmented World Expo (AWE2014), in which he explained the background and evolution of head-mounted displays and the history and design of Nvidia’s near-eye light field display prototypes: Continue reading

May 27

MIT: Compressive Light Field Projection System for new Glasses-Free 3D Displays

Illustration of concept. A light field projector, build using readily-available optics and electronics, emits a 4D light field onto a screen that expands the field of view so that observers on the other side of the screen can enjoy glasses-free 3D entertainment. No mechanically moving parts are used in either the projector or the screen. Additionally, the screen is completely passive, potentially allowing for the system to be scaled to significantly larger dimensions. (picture: MIT Media Lab, Camera Culture Group)Today’s glasses-free 3D displays ususally consist of dozens of devices, which makes them not only very complex, but also bulky, energy-consuming and costly. At SIGGRAPH 2014 conference, Gordon Wetzstein and Matthew Hirsch from the MIT’s Camera Culture Group presented a new approach to glasses-free 3D that is based on projectors and optical technology found in Keplerian telescopes. Their novel method for “Compressive Light Field Projection” consists of a single device without mechanically moving parts.
Because it’s relatively cheap to build with today’s optics and electronics, the presented prototype could pave the way for cinema-scale glasses-free 3D displays. Continue reading

Jul 25

Refocus your Eyes: Nvidia presents Near-Eye Light Field Display Prototype

At this year’s SIGGRAPH conference, currently taking place in Anaheim CA, tech blog Engadget spotted an unusual participant in the “Emerging Technologies” section. Douglas Lanman and David Luebke from the research labs at graphics processing specialist Nvidia presented what may be considered a prototype of the future of Virtual Reality: a near-eye light field display.

But what does it do?
Microlens arrays, which are mounted just in front of the high resolution displays, are used to convert pixels to individual light rays, thus creating a light field directly in front of the eye. The viewer is thus able to refocus at multiple depths into the scene.

Refocus your Eyes: Nvidia presents Near-Eye Light Field Display Prototype (picture: Lanman & Luebke 2013)

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Apr 11

HP Labs develops new Glasses-Free, Wide Angle 3D Screen Technology

HP Labs develops new Glasses-Free, Wide Angle 3D Screen Technology (photo: HP Labs) 3D displays are slowly moving into mainstream, but most of the technologies used today require the viewers to wear special 3D glasses, or watch from a very defined, small optimum viewpoint. More advanced 3D displays use eye tracking, and create a stereoscopic effect by specifically sending different images to either eye.
David Fattal and colleagues from HP Laboratories in Palo Alto, California developed a new approach to glasses-free 3D displays, which comes with a number of improvements: Their prototype displays use multi-directional diffractive backlight technology, which makes them particularly well-suited for mobile devices (e.g. smartphones, tablets, or watches). They’re high-resolution, very thin (<1 mm), don’t require eye tracking, and feature a very wide view zone (up to 180 degrees) at an observation distance of up to a metre. Their work was recently published in Nature.

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Nov 08

Lytro Specifications: A Deeper Look Inside

Are you really interested in the details of Lytro’s LightField Camera? Is the official information not enough for you?
Lytro Specifications: A deeper Look Inside (Illustration: NY Times) Here are some interesting bits & pieces of information about Lytro’s LightField Camera that have accumulated in my virtual notebook over the last few months.
All of these details were mentioned on the web and/or in public presentations (sources are given at the end of the article), but they’re not quite as publically available as the standard information. One of these presentations was a technical introduction to plenoptic imaging by Lytro CTO Kurt Akeley at the University of Washington, titled “A different perspective on the Lytro light field camera”.

How many microlenses are in a Lytro camera?
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