Oct 29

More Immersive 360 Degree VR Video: Facebook Surround 360 and Adobe Sidewinder

Facebook Surround 360, x24 and x6 models (picture: UploadVR.com) Earlier this year, Facebook and OTOY revealed a new recording technique to combine 360 degree video with depth information. The football-sized sphere contains 24 cameras (there’s also a smaller version with just 6 cameras), allows the recording of 360 degree virtual reality video with 6 degrees of freedom, making it possible for viewers to not only turn their head and look around themselves while locked into the fixed position of the camera, but move around slightly in the scene.

Now, at the Adobe MAX creator’s conference in Las Vegas, Adobe has unveiled project Sidewinder, an experimental software tool which creates a very similar effect based on just two camera views. Continue reading

Jul 17

New Apple Patent: Light Field Cameras for more Immersive Video Calls with Augmented Reality

Apple’s latest light field patent describes the use of a camera array for immersive augmented reality (AR), live display walls, head mounted displays, video conferencing, and similar applications based on a user’s point of view. The patent application, simply titled “Light field capture”, talks about AR video conferencing where the user’s background can be replaced with other information (e.g. their own view of a scene, or live sports).

New Apple Patent: Light Field Cameras for more Immersive Video Calls and Augmented Reality (Picture: Motta et al. 2016)

The invention also includes concepts including pixel culling (i.e. following the user’s movements and cropping to the interesting parts of the entire camera view), conversion of 3D data to 2D views for the left and right eyes of the second party,
Interestingly, the authors also mention the possibility for a hybrid display/camera-array that would integrate both devices into a single, light-field sensing screen.

New Apple Patent: Light Field Cameras for more Immersive Video Calls and Augmented Reality (Picture: Motta et al. 2016)

For more information, check out Patently Apple and Patent US9681096 – Light field capture on Google Patents.

Jun 25

Patent: Integrated Light Field Sensor on a Chip

Patent: Integrated Light Field Sensor on a Chip (Figure by Kim 2017, modified by www.lightfield-forum.com) Current light field sensors typically consist of an imaging sensor and a separate microlens array, both of which are assembled into an optical system. While this allows the use of common CCD- or CMOS sensors, it may also introduce some issues where extreme precision is needed for optimal imaging conditions, e.g. with microlenses of micrometer-range focal lengths. A mismatch of these separately fabricated elements can affect image quality.
A new patent application by Jong Eun Kim at SK hynix (Korea) aims to solve these potential issues: The patent application details a novel light field imaging device where the microlens array is formed on top of the imaging sensor. Continue reading

May 07

Video: The Making of Hallelujah with Lytro Immerge

Lytro recently upped their Immerge VR Camera to the next generation, with a larger and planar camera array for easier VR video production. Their most highly promoted feature is recording content at 6 degrees of freedom, meaning that you can’t just rotate your view around, but actually move your head around in space (within limits).

At the recent Tribeca Film Festival, the company presented a first VR video experience titled “Hallelujah”, featuring a performance of Leonard Cohen’s popular song, and recorded with the Lytro second-gen Immerge. Lytro’s “Making Of” video not only hints at what VR viewers will see in the video, but also gives some insight into the Immerge production controls and interfaces: Continue reading

Apr 22

Light Field Lab: Startup is Working on Glasses-Free Holographic TV Sets

Light Field Lab: Startup is Working on Glasses-Free Holographic TV Sets using Light FIeld Tech (picture: Light Field Lab) At this week’s National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show in Las Vegas, a startup named Light Field Lab has announced they’re developing the next big thing in display technology: glasses-free holographic TVs.
Founded by former Lytro specialists Jon Karafin (former Head of Light Field Video at Lytro), Brendan Bevensee (former Lead Engineer at Lytro) and Ed Ibe (former Lead Hardware Engineer at Lytro), the company is working on the “next generation of light field display technologies”. Continue reading