Mar 15

New Light Field Tech to use Transparent Sensor Layers instead of Microlenses

New Light Field Tech to use Transparent Sensor Layers instead of Microlenses (picture: Stephen Alvey/Michigan Engineering) Light field technology that’s currently available, like the Lytro Illum or Raytrix’ industrial light field cameras, is largely based on microlens arrays which allow the flat imaging sensor to infer the direction of light rays in addition to their colour and intensity. While Raytrix has managed to ramp up spatial resolution to 25% of the actual sensor resolution by way of a customised, heterogeneous microlens array, effective resolution is still a limitation of today’s light field cameras.

Now, researchers at the Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Lab, University of Michigan, have announced working on a different approach that would allow capturing complete light fields at full sensor resolution. Rather than microlenses in front of a standard imaging sensor, the team around Zhaohui Zhong are developing a new sensor consisting of several transparent light detectors based on graphene, a material consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms. Continue reading

Mar 13

New Apple Patent for Light Field Camera …in Manufacturing Processes

New Apple Patent for Light Field Camera ...in Manufacturing Processes (Picture: Apple) Light field imaging has captured the mind of many technology enthusiasts and imaging pioneers, and there have been rumours of light field cameras in future iPhones or Android smartphones.
Now a new patent has surfaced that shows Apple is still interested in light field cameras. The twist is, the proposed “plenoptic” (a.k.a. light field) camera system is intended to aid robots in the manufacturing process. Continue reading

Jan 09

Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy

Almost as soon as the original Lytro camera was released, enthusiasts tried to find an easy way to combine light field imaging with microscopes. However, due to the optical characteristics of a microscope (especially the strong f-number mismatch), those attempts had only limited success.

Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy (picture: Mignard & Ihrke 2015)
Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy (picture: Mignard & Ihrke 2015)

In a recent publication, Loïs Mignard-Debise and Ivo Ihrke from INRIA Bordeaux in France presented the findings of their experiments to use off-the-shelf hardware (i.e. a first-generation lytro camera and camera lenses or microscope objectives) for a working light field microscope. Continue reading

Nov 09

Special Offer: Lytro Illum for 400 US-Dollars at Woot.com

If you’ve been thinking of buying a Lytro Illum light field camera, today might be your day: Reader Todd (hat tip!) just let us know that the Illum is on sale at Woot.com today for 399.99 US-Dollars – that’s an incredile 75% off retail price.

Special Offer: Lytro Illum for 400 US-Dollars at Woot

The offer is good for another 21 hours from posting this, or until stocks run out. Unfortunately, Woot.com only ships to continental USA, so international buyers will need a mail forwarding service.

Nov 07

Lytro Immerge: Company Focuses on Cinematic Virtual Reality Creation

Earlier this week, Lytro announced a new product which takes the company into a new direction: The Lytro Immerge is a futuristic-looking sphere with five rings of light field cameras and sensors to capture the entire light field volume of a scene. The resulting video will be compatible with major virtual reality platforms and headsets such as the Oculus Rift, and allow viewers to look around anywhere from the Immerge’s fixed position, providing an immersive, 360 degree live-action experience.

Lytro Immerge: Company Focuses on Cinematic Virtual Reality Creation

Continue reading