Jan 09

Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy

Almost as soon as the original Lytro camera was released, enthusiasts tried to find an easy way to combine light field imaging with microscopes. However, due to the optical characteristics of a microscope (especially the strong f-number mismatch), those attempts had only limited success.

Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy (picture: Mignard & Ihrke 2015)
Paper: How to use a First-Generation Lytro Camera for Light Field Microscopy (picture: Mignard & Ihrke 2015)

In a recent publication, Loïs Mignard-Debise and Ivo Ihrke from INRIA Bordeaux in France presented the findings of their experiments to use off-the-shelf hardware (i.e. a first-generation lytro camera and camera lenses or microscope objectives) for a working light field microscope. Continue reading

Aug 17

Ricoh Patents Dynamically Adjustable Multimode Lightfield Imaging System

Ricoh Patents Dynamically Adjustable Multimode Lightfield Imaging System (Fig. modified from Shroff & Berkner 2014) Ricoh researchers Sapna A. Shroff and Kathrin Berkner have lodged a patent application that describes a new way to dynamically adjust the recording parameters of a light field camera. The US Patent and Trademark Office has recently published patent application US20140192255, entitled “Dynamic Adjustment of Multimode Lightfield Imaging System Using Exposure Condition and Filter Position”, in which the authors use a non-homogeneous filter module at the pupil plane of a multimode imaging system, which can be moved and thus used to modify the imaging system’s exposure conditions. Continue reading

May 04

Light Field Microscope: New Imaging System Allows Real-Time 3D Microscopy

Light Field Microscopy: New Imaging System Allows Real-Time 3D Microscopy (image: Kim et al. 2014) One of the most exciting fields in science where light field imaging (or plenoptic imaging) has a great potential is microscopy: Not only is the depth of field very limited in microscopy, it also enables us to observe things much smaller than what the eye can see. Extended depth of field and 3D reconstruction would offer many opportunities, such as to better understand the three-dimensional internal structure of plant- or animal cells and tissues, to name just one example.
3D imaging using multi-camera approaches is very difficult in microscopy due to space limitations and the strong effects of parallax, but light field imaging can solve these problems. Until now, however, light field microscopy is still largely defined by resource-intensive post-processing, which limits real-time applications and observations.

In a recent publication in the journal Optics Express, researchers from Seoul National University and Harvard Medical School in Boston present a novel light field microscopy system that enables light field microscopy with real-time 3D display. Continue reading

Jul 07

Lightfield 3D Microscopy: Raytrix Showcases the R5µ

Lightfield 3D Microscopy: Raytrix Showcases the R5µ (picture: Raytrix) German Light field specialist Raytrix has just added another use case of their range of plenoptic cameras for scientific and industrial use: The new Lightfield 3D Microscopy webpage page makes a first mention of the R5μ light field camera setup, which is optimized specifically for microscopy applications.
In the picture, Raytrix’ R5 high-speed video lightfield camera (model number R5-M-E-GE-A260-GS-A) is shown in conjunction with a Solino 0.8x High Resolution Tube for Fixed Magnification (177 mm, C-mount camera interface, Art.No. 045-200162), an objective adapter and a Leica objective lens for 10x magnification.

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Feb 23

Video: Introducing the Stanford LightField Microscope

The following video, brought to our attention by reader Alejandro, shows how LightField technology can significantly augment traditional microscopy:

The advantages are numerous, and represent the “ordinary” LightField Features but applied to microscopy: Instead of just a single “head-on” orthographic view, a plenoptic microscope setup allows for software refocus, increased depth of field, focal stacks, oblique orthographic views and perspective, 3D reconstruction and volume rendering.

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